Interviews from the Void: Episode #19 – Amy DuBoff

Highlights Why writing science fiction allows us to explore the human experience. Self-publishing and being part of the entire publishing process. There’s a new way to watch television which can help us improve our writing. From initial conception to publishing the first volume, it was a seventeen-year journey. Welcome to the nineteenth episode of Interviews from the Void, where I interview writers about their writing process, discussing the mechanics and physicality of the craft. In this episode, I chat with science fiction writer Amy (A.K.) DuBoff about self-publishing and finding our own writing voice in the science fiction genre. Arthur: You’re a prolific writer. Tell me about your journey to becoming a writer. When did you start writing and how did you get to where you are today? Amy: I can trace my first real writing project back to fourth grade. We were given a writing prompt (“It was a dark and story night…”), and I began working on a middle grade horror/mystery/adventure novel that was starting to turn a little sci-fi/fantasy before I abandoned it. I might go back to that project eventually, but I’d need to figure out where it was going since I had no idea at the time! I really started writing in sixth grade, when I was about 11. I’d been kicking ideas for the Cadicle series around in my head for several months, so I wanted to get words on the page. I wrote the first few chapters of what eventually became VEIL OF REALITY,[…] [Keep Reading]

Interviews from the Void: Episode #18 – Bill Ricardi

Highlights Developing maps and world building for fantasy stories. The importance of a book’s first line and how it is a promise to the reader of what’s to come. Our writing space and setting rules to free ourselves from distraction. I’m a proponent of the short, sharp paragraph. Welcome to the eighteenth episode of Interviews from the Void, where I interview writers about their writing process, discussing the mechanics and physicality of the craft. In this episode, I chat with fantasy writer Bill Ricardi about focus and the importance of writing a books’ first sentences. Arthur: I always love a book that starts out with a map. In ANOTHER STUPID SPELL, how did you develop Panos? How much world-building did you do before (or during) the writing of the book? Bill: Panos had about a month of backstory work before I wrote a single word that appears in the actual book. I started with the major gods, since I knew that they would be pivotal to the story. Then the Orc nations, because that was going to be my character’s main focus. The magic system came next, which is a mix of Kabbalistic principles and gaming tropes. Then the rest of the races, which in turn determined the landscape, the politics, and everything else. Arthur: The first line of ANOTHER STUPID SPELL is: “Me smart orc.” You had me right there. There’s a lot of writing theory about developing a great first line of a book, even beyond that to first[…] [Keep Reading]

Interviews from the Void: Episode #17 – Colette Tozer

Highlights Strategies for promoting our own books as self-published writers. Learning through life experiences and expressing ourselves through our writing. Editing and editing resources for self-publishing writers. My writing is character-driven, so the time, experience, and multiple revisions help me develop the characters.  Welcome to the seventeenth episode of Interviews from the Void, where I interview writers about their writing process, discussing the mechanics and physicality of the craft. In this episode, I chat with Colette Tozer, author of FAMILY TITHES, about editing her first book and what she learned during the self-publishing process. Arthur: Did you outline your first book, FAMILY TITHES? What are the most important lessons you learned while writing your first book? Was it self-published? Colette: FAMILY TITHES is part of a series that I started when I was ten years old. It kind of grew up with me.  So, while I didn’t intentionally write an outline, the books I wrote previous to the published book served as an outline. My writing is character driven, so the time, experience, and multiple revisions helped me to develop the characters. The main lesson I learned while writing my first book is that nothing is perfect. Everything is open to interpretation and with experience, everything changes. Yes, my book was self-published. I am an indie author, working on publishing many more books. Arthur: Since you’re self published, can you give me insight on your editing process? Do you hire an editor? How can writers seeking to self publish –[…] [Keep Reading]

Interviews from the Void: Episode #16 – K. M. Weiland

Highlights Writing a lot is the only thing that will improve our writing. The importance of outlining and the time it takes to write a great novel. Writing novels takes several years. Welcome to the sixteenth episode of Interviews from the Void, where I interview writers about their writing process, discussing the mechanics and physicality of the craft. In this episode, I chat with historical and speculative fiction writer K. M. Weiland about her prolific writing abilities and growing her writing business. For those writers out there who feel they are taking too long to work on a particular project, this interview is for you. I’ve learned by reading extensively…and putting in many, many hours writing my own words. Arthur: Your website is fantastic, filled with great articles with writing tips and your books, both fiction and non-fiction. Writing is also your full-time job. Did you always want to be a writer? Did you study writing in any school, or have you done what most of us do, just learn by writing? Katie: Becoming a writer wasn’t so much a decision. It just happened—which is how I think the right things in life usually happen. I grew up horse crazy, spent part of every summer working on a friend’s cattle ranch in Wyoming, and thought I’d end up being a horse trainer. But somewhere in high school, I realized I was having more fun staying inside and writing than I was going outside and riding. So after graduation, I sold the horses and[…] [Keep Reading]