Interviews from the Void: Episode #41 – K. M. Pohlkamp

Highlights The importance of the first sentence and scene of our books. More ideas on promoting our writing work. Switching genre and age group to meet your own prose and writing voice may help us writers succeed. I rewrite the opening pages of all my manuscripts more than any other part of a work-in-progress. Welcome to the forty-first episode of Interviews from the Void, where I interview writers about their writing process, discussing the mechanics and physicality of the craft. In this episode, I chat with historical fiction author K. M. Pohlkamp. From APRICOTS AND WOLFSBANE: “My target focused upon me. His hand shook, reaching out in a misplace plea for aid. Instead, I raised my goblet in a final toast while he turned purple. He glanced towards his spilled glass, and then studied my face with new understanding. With his last remnants of life, he pieced together what I had done. Those little moments made the act so delicious. And as his body collapsed upon the floor, I added one more success to my mental tally. Murder just never got old.” Arthur: The opening lines of your book APRICOTS AND WOLFSBANE are fantastic. They establish not only a great opening scene, but the motivation and desires of the main character. And it’s done in a way that doesn’t take chapters to understand while drawing the reader in immediately. How did you craft the first chapter and this scene? Was it original to the first draft, or did it come[…] [Keep Reading]

Interviews from the Void: Episode #40 – Dana L. Brown

Highlights The importance of the technical aspects of writing, beyond putting words on paper. How themes can be derived from our own life experiences. Creative marketing ideas beyond social media. It doesn’t matter how old you are, or how you’ve spent the majority of your life, you’re never too old to start a new path. Welcome to the fortieth episode of Interviews from the Void, where I interview writers about their writing process, discussing the mechanics and physicality of the craft. In this episode, I chat with Women’s Romantic Fiction writer Dana L. Brown. Arthur: Tell me about your writing journey. How did you start writing and what brought you to where you are today? Dana: I like to call my writing journey My Fairytale. An avid reader, a book started forming in my mind as my husband and I rode our bicycles on the weekends, and in 2014 I told him I wanted to take early retirement to write a book. Once the “deer in the headlights” look left his face he asked if I could one more year, and I did. On February 5, 2016 I retired from a thirty-two career in banking, and on February 8, after the celebration was over and out of town guests had gone home, I sat down to write. Maybe because I had been writing the book in my head for two years, or maybe because I was so determined to prove I could do it, Lottie Loser almost wrote itself. In[…] [Keep Reading]

Interviews from the Void: Episode #39 – Mica Scotti Kole

Highlights You need to be able to answer the question: “What sets your book apart?” The most common problems an editor sees when reviewing a manuscript. How to write a great first sentence of a book. The overuse of “was/is” and “felt/feel” is the most concrete problem I see. Welcome to the thirty ninth episode of Interviews from the Void, where I interview writers about their writing process, discussing the mechanics and physicality of the craft. In this episode, I chat with YA fantasy writer and editor Mica Scotti Kole. Arthur: Your Twitter account indicates you once wrote 25k words in a day. Tell me more about this day. What did you write? How did you achieve this word count? How were you able to focus for so long? Was it one long writing session, or broken up throughout the day? Mica: Oh, it was definitely not one straight session! I did this for the 3-Day Novel Contest, where you write a book over Labor Day Weekend. I had an outline, subsisted on Monster Energy and Spaghettios, and had to have someone else watch my cat for the day so she’d leave me alone. And I just tore through. The inspiration and momentum were there. By the end of the three-day weekend, I had over 50,000 words written and revised once. It was a wild ride. (This was the first draft of my first major publication attempt, the Adult Fantasy THE TOWER WITH NO WALLS.) Arthur: Tell me about your[…] [Keep Reading]

THE SCHLIKT Audio

Halloween 2018 was one of my personal favorites. We had a great many riveting writers sharing their work via audio for the Kyanite Press Special Halloween Edition. A special thanks again to the team at Kyanite Press for promoting such a fun way to share the Halloween spirit. If you haven’t picked up your copy, it’s a great edition. Also be sure to check out the audio version of my short story, THE SCHLIKT, for what I hope to be a riveting experience for my readers (and now my listeners).  [Keep Reading]

Interviews from the Void: Episode #38 – Matthew William

Highlights Bringing a story to different formats for our audiences. Why writing for the audio drama is different than writing a novel. Why conflict is essential to our stories, no matter what the format. The act of creating something was thrilling. Here’s a world that exists now and it didn’t a moment ago. Welcome to the thirty-eighth episode of Interviews from the Void, where I interview writers about their writing process, discussing the mechanics and physicality of the craft. In this episode, I chat with audio drama writer and screenwriter Matthew William. From Matthew’s short story, THE MORE I DISAPPEAR: “It’s hard to remember that he’s not me. Not exactly anyway. Genetically speaking, yes, he’s a perfect match. But since the moment he was born our experiences have been slowly and steadily forming us into different people. Driving us further and further apart, like two roads diverging in the woods, never to cross paths again.” Arthur: Tell me more about your writing journey. What is your background and how did you come upon the writing craft? Matthew: I wrote my first story in school when I was about 7 or 8. It wasn’t a writing assignment or anything like that, just something I decided to do on my own. And I discovered that the act of creating something was thrilling. Here’s a world that exists now and it didn’t exist a moment ago. And even though it was just a crappy Wizard of Oz knockoff, I was hooked. For some reason my[…] [Keep Reading]