The Aesthetics of Editing

For those curious about what editing physically looks like, here’s a page from my short story: Saturn: Journey to the Core. It’s interesting to look back on this and see how much I crossed out. I didn’t delete just words, but entire sentences. The first paragraph was deleted in the final version as it was not essential to the telling of the story. I read this short story again and can cut even more while improving the prose here and there, given my growth as a writer in the past four years. However, I’m not ready to make any changes yet. SATURN was my first published work, and to keep it in its original form seems like the appropriate action at the moment. Perhaps it will change in the future when I return to this story world. (Yes, that means we will hear more from the OKULOUS crew in due time…)  [Keep Reading]

Interviews from the Void: Episode #17 – Colette Tozer

Highlights Strategies for promoting our own books as self-published writers. Learning through life experiences and expressing ourselves through our writing. Editing and editing resources for self-publishing writers. My writing is character-driven, so the time, experience, and multiple revisions help me develop the characters.  Welcome to the seventeenth episode of Interviews from the Void, where I interview writers about their writing process, discussing the mechanics and physicality of the craft. In this episode, I chat with Colette Tozer, author of FAMILY TITHES, about editing her first book and what she learned during the self-publishing process. Arthur: Did you outline your first book, FAMILY TITHES? What are the most important lessons you learned while writing your first book? Was it self-published? Colette: FAMILY TITHES is part of a series that I started when I was ten years old. It kind of grew up with me.  So, while I didn’t intentionally write an outline, the books I wrote previous to the published book served as an outline. My writing is character driven, so the time, experience, and multiple revisions helped me to develop the characters. The main lesson I learned while writing my first book is that nothing is perfect. Everything is open to interpretation and with experience, everything changes. Yes, my book was self-published. I am an indie author, working on publishing many more books. Arthur: Since you’re self published, can you give me insight on your editing process? Do you hire an editor? How can writers seeking to self publish –[…] [Keep Reading]

Interviews from the Void: Episode #7 – Eric Lahti

Highlights How we make time for the things we want to pursue. The type of experiences we are hoping to create for our readers. How listening to people talk helps us write great dialogue. I sincerely believe you make time for the things you want to do.  Welcome to the seventh episode of Interviews from the Void, where I interview writers about their writing process, discussing the mechanics and physicality of the craft. In this episode, I chat with writer Eric Lahti about his writing process, finding more time for the craft and why he writes. Arthur: On your blog, you mention you started writing five years ago. What made you start writing? And what has been the most rewarding experience you’ve taken from your writing experience? Eric: In late 2013, I was watching TV and playing Saints Row for the umpteenth time. Something clicked and I wondered if there wasn’t more out there than just watching things happen. I’d had the idea for Henchmen pinging around in my head for a while at that point (although it was quite a lot different from what that book eventually became) so I cracked open Word and started writing. About six pages in, my wife asked me what I was doing. That was a sheer panic moment – not as bad as handing her those pages to read, I hid in my office while she was reading them. Finishing that book was rewarding in and of itself. Writing a book is a[…] [Keep Reading]