Interviews from the Void: Episode #49 – B. K. Bass

Welcome to the forty-ninth episode of Interviews from the Void, where I interview writers about their writing process, discussing the mechanics and physicality of the craft. In this episode, I’m very excited to be chatting with BK Bass, my friend at Kyanite Publishing. I met Mr. Bass through Benjamin Hope, and they’ve published two of my short stories: THE SCHLIKT and HUMAN. Mr. Bass also shares more writing knowledge in an in-depth interview with our mutual creative friend and photographer, Andrew Hall. Arthur: Tell me about how you came into writing. Are there any experiences you have which inspire your stories? BK: I fell into it at a young age. In fifth grade I started reading Greek mythology, Edgar Allan Poe, Terry Brooks, Tolkien, and others. I fell in love with everything fantasy, mythological, and macabre. Soon, that branched out into science fiction. It wasn’t long before school writing assignments turned into a chance to explore my love of these stories from the other side of the pen, and before you know it, I was writing for fun. I kept practicing for about 25 years, and here I am today! Arthur: Tell me about Kyanite Publishing. I love working with you and your team. How did the idea for the company come about? What were the challenges? What has been the most positive part of the experience for you? BK: Thank you! My partner and I originally got together to do an indie book review site, and in the process[…] [Keep Reading]

Interviews from the Void: Episode #19 – Amy DuBoff

Highlights Why writing science fiction allows us to explore the human experience. Self-publishing and being part of the entire publishing process. There’s a new way to watch television which can help us improve our writing. From initial conception to publishing the first volume, it was a seventeen-year journey. Welcome to the nineteenth episode of Interviews from the Void, where I interview writers about their writing process, discussing the mechanics and physicality of the craft. In this episode, I chat with science fiction writer Amy (A.K.) DuBoff about self-publishing and finding our own writing voice in the science fiction genre. Arthur: You’re a prolific writer. Tell me about your journey to becoming a writer. When did you start writing and how did you get to where you are today? Amy: I can trace my first real writing project back to fourth grade. We were given a writing prompt (“It was a dark and story night…”), and I began working on a middle grade horror/mystery/adventure novel that was starting to turn a little sci-fi/fantasy before I abandoned it. I might go back to that project eventually, but I’d need to figure out where it was going since I had no idea at the time! I really started writing in sixth grade, when I was about 11. I’d been kicking ideas for the Cadicle series around in my head for several months, so I wanted to get words on the page. I wrote the first few chapters of what eventually became VEIL OF REALITY,[…] [Keep Reading]

Interviews from the Void: Episode #18 – Bill Ricardi

Highlights Developing maps and world building for fantasy stories. The importance of a book’s first line and how it is a promise to the reader of what’s to come. Our writing space and setting rules to free ourselves from distraction. I’m a proponent of the short, sharp paragraph. Welcome to the eighteenth episode of Interviews from the Void, where I interview writers about their writing process, discussing the mechanics and physicality of the craft. In this episode, I chat with fantasy writer Bill Ricardi about focus and the importance of writing a books’ first sentences. Arthur: I always love a book that starts out with a map. In ANOTHER STUPID SPELL, how did you develop Panos? How much world-building did you do before (or during) the writing of the book? Bill: Panos had about a month of backstory work before I wrote a single word that appears in the actual book. I started with the major gods, since I knew that they would be pivotal to the story. Then the Orc nations, because that was going to be my character’s main focus. The magic system came next, which is a mix of Kabbalistic principles and gaming tropes. Then the rest of the races, which in turn determined the landscape, the politics, and everything else. Arthur: The first line of ANOTHER STUPID SPELL is: “Me smart orc.” You had me right there. There’s a lot of writing theory about developing a great first line of a book, even beyond that to first[…] [Keep Reading]

Interviews from the Void: Episode #13 – Claire Luana

Highlights That there’s no substitute for just doing the work of writing. Finding time to write while maintaining a demanding full-time job. Editing and the self-publishing process. There’s no substitute for just doing. Welcome to the thirteenth episode of Interviews from the Void, where I interview writers about their writing process, discussing the mechanics and physicality of the craft. In this episode, I chat with YA fantasy writer Claire Luana about finding more time to write and growing her brand and writing business. Arthur: Very recently, you quit a regular (and demanding, I should say) day job to write. One of the things I’m searching for in these interviews is how writers can make more time for writing and increase their productivity. When you had your full-time job, what was your writing schedule? Trying to do it all – write, work, and do normal life activities – were you ever completely exhausted? How did you push through and keep writing? Claire: Thanks for having me on the blog, Arthur! When I first started writing, I would write on the bus on the way to and from work (about a 40 minute ride each way). That worked great (so long as I got a seat that day!) But, about a year into writing, my commute changed, so I needed to find a new solution. I’m a morning person and found that I absolutely couldn’t write worth a damn after a long day of work. The obvious solution was to write in[…] [Keep Reading]

Interviews from the Void: Episode #10 – Adam Inglis

Highlights There are no hard rules to writing. Managing all the tasks associated with being a writer. Strategies for our writing productivity when we only have 20-30 free minutes per day. It has an adventurous and hopeful feel, which fits my attitude to writing.  Welcome to the tenth episode of Interviews from the Void, where I interview writers about their writing process, discussing the mechanics and physicality of the craft. In this episode, I chat with short fiction writer, Adam Inglis, about how he focuses during his writing sessions. Arthur: Your website is very well maintained. Do you run it yourself? Adam: Thank you, it has taken quite a lot of work to get it looking the way it does. In short, yes I run it. I own the domain from one company (fasthosts) but the hosting and design tool comes from wix.com. They have a rather bold claim that “It all starts with your stunning website.” There is, however, some restrictions on what you can and can’t do. If you can live with that, then it’s a decent service. It took a while to accept that what I wanted was too complex. The website as it can be seen today is a happy compromise. Arthur: How do you create the images on your site? Adam: I created all the artwork using free-to-use images that I’ve either manipulated in an editor, or cropped and filtered. It is an obsessive compulsion to give every story, or poem, a sort of “cover[…] [Keep Reading]

Interviews from the Void: Episode #5 – Christopher Ryan

Highlights Why failure is not only normal, but necessary. Charting our own paths as writers instead of following the crowd. Why being a writer is worth our time, even when it seems difficult to continue. In a way, writing allows you to live forever and that is worthy of your time. Welcome to the fifth episode of Interviews from the Void, where I interview writers about their writing process, discussing the mechanics and physicality of the craft. In this episode, I’ve asked fantasy Christopher Ryan about his writing process, self publishing, and turning failure into a means for finding success in writing. A. Macabe: On your blog, you discuss “killing” drafts of your previous novel, The Godkiller Chronicles – which is an awesome name. What did you learn from this process? What are you doing differently now for Children of the Void? Ryan: I had spent so many years drafting what wound up being Godkiller Chronicles that I could have published three books from the sheer amount of pages I had. But, all in all it came down to, would I read this? The brutal answer was, hell no. The work was crap. I just didn’t want to admit it to myself for a long time. When I was able to finally say to myself “this is dreck and needs to be abandoned,” I didn’t want to just shelve the work and walk away. I wanted to be proactive about it. So, I took the characters and themes and the fictional[…] [Keep Reading]