Upcoming Works for 2019

Greetings, readers and writers of the Void. I’ve been busy with a few projects that I hope to share with you soon. New Short Stories First, there are two short stories I’ve been working on. One is top secret, while the other is for Kyanite Press’ upcoming social science fiction issue. If these are published, I’ll be excited to share them with readers. Science Fiction Podcast I’ve written on Twitter about a science fiction podcast I’ve been writing. The overall story is based on my short story, SATURN: JOURNEY TO THE CORE. We’ve recorded one episode, and I’m excited to share it with the Void. We can’t wait to share more in the coming months. I did the voice acting and continue to hone my narration for new episodes. Interviews from the Void 2018 was an incredible year. I was so thankful to connect with many talented writers who were willing to participate in my interview series, INTERVIEWS FROM THE VOID, and share their knowledge on the craft. This was a great project for everyone and I will continue to revamp the series for their new works and share with the writing community. OKULOUS-10 OKULOUS-10 is an experimental reading and writing project about the first manned spaceship exploring beyond our solar system. I will continue this story in February after I complete my two short story submissions. 2018 Works Lastly, I want to mention other short stories that have provided enjoyment for others in 2018. THE SCHLIKT – You can check[…] [Keep Reading]

THE SCHLIKT Audio

Halloween 2018 was one of my personal favorites. We had a great many riveting writers sharing their work via audio for the Kyanite Press Special Halloween Edition. A special thanks again to the team at Kyanite Press for promoting such a fun way to share the Halloween spirit. If you haven’t picked up your copy, it’s a great edition. Also be sure to check out the audio version of my short story, THE SCHLIKT, for what I hope to be a riveting experience for my readers (and now my listeners).  [Keep Reading]

Short Story: THE SCHLIKT

Super happy to announce my short story, THE SCHLIKT, was published this month in Kyanite Press’ special Halloween addition. A lot of great writers have their work in this publication, including Benjamin Hope and Eric Lahti. I’ve interviewed both of these great writers and can’t wait to see more of their work. Benjamin’s piece in particular reminded me of M. R. James, one of my personal favorites. A very special thanks needs to be given to B. K. Bass, for putting this all together. In addition, thank you Sam Hendricks for her editing and proofreading work. Thank you so much. And of course, thank you to the writers who contributed their work for the rest of us to read and enjoy. It’s all about the story and the creative minds behind it. [Keep Reading]

Interviews from the Void: Episode #12 – Kristina Mahr

Highlights Pursuing our dreams as writers. The traditional publishing process. The importance of writing weekly short stories to improve our writing craft. This is my dream, and that I am lucky to have the opportunity to pursue it. Welcome to the twelfth episode of Interviews from the Void, where I interview writers about their writing process, discussing the mechanics and physicality of the craft. In this episode, I chat with young adult writer Kristina Mahr about finding more time to write and growing her brand with her first book, ALL THAT WE SEE OR SEEM, coming out on May 15, 2018.    Arthur: Your first book, “All That We See or Seem,” is coming out on May 15. Congratulations on your first book! What a great accomplishment! How did you just decide “I’m going to do this” and push through all the obstacles of writing a book? Kristina: Thank you so much! Honestly, it was years in the making. My New Year’s resolution had been “write a book,” or “try to write a book,” or some variation of that with increasing frustration with myself since college. I would chip away at an adult contemporary novel that lived in my head, but I was very sporadic and inconsistent with my writing time. Until my sister had a dream one night about a girl who falls in love with a boy she meets in her dreams, and I couldn’t shake it. I have been an avid Young Adult reader for years, and[…] [Keep Reading]

Interviews from the Void: Episode #10 – Adam Inglis

Highlights There are no hard rules to writing. Managing all the tasks associated with being a writer. Strategies for our writing productivity when we only have 20-30 free minutes per day. It has an adventurous and hopeful feel, which fits my attitude to writing.  Welcome to the tenth episode of Interviews from the Void, where I interview writers about their writing process, discussing the mechanics and physicality of the craft. In this episode, I chat with short fiction writer, Adam Inglis, about how he focuses during his writing sessions. Arthur: Your website is very well maintained. Do you run it yourself? Adam: Thank you, it has taken quite a lot of work to get it looking the way it does. In short, yes I run it. I own the domain from one company (fasthosts) but the hosting and design tool comes from wix.com. They have a rather bold claim that “It all starts with your stunning website.” There is, however, some restrictions on what you can and can’t do. If you can live with that, then it’s a decent service. It took a while to accept that what I wanted was too complex. The website as it can be seen today is a happy compromise. Arthur: How do you create the images on your site? Adam: I created all the artwork using free-to-use images that I’ve either manipulated in an editor, or cropped and filtered. It is an obsessive compulsion to give every story, or poem, a sort of “cover[…] [Keep Reading]

Interviews from the Void: Episode #9 – Bryan Aiello

Highlights Why we need to write more than one novel to improve as writers. Being brief in our prose while keeping the flow of the story interesting. The importance of setting goals for ourselves and doing what we say we’re going to do. Writing a singular novel is not going to make you a good novelist. Writing many novels will though. Welcome to the ninth episode of Interviews from the Void, where I interview writers about their writing process, discussing the mechanics and physicality of the craft. In this episode, I chat with speculative fiction writer Bryan Aiello about finding more time to write and where he finds his inspiration. Arthur: You’re an Army Veteran. I want to personally thank you for your service. You discuss on your blog that you’re working on a military science fiction novel for 2019. Will your military experience have any influence in the story? Bryan: I enjoy writing about soldiers. If I was forced to boil it down, most of the work I have done is fictionalized military history. I use my experiences digging foxholes to imagine what life is like for people under the gun. I do have a military fiction short story collection I would like to publish. I have not done so yet. Is there ever a right time? It’s got about nine stories in it at the moment. I am debating whether there might be a more concise way to construct a collection. Hopefully within the year I will have decided[…] [Keep Reading]

10 Editing Examples – Entry #2

Editing is hard. As writers, we want every word we write to be perfectly used; etched in stone. Sometimes we must break the rock. Below are examples of my edits for my latest short story with brief explanations as to why I made the changes. I hope these examples will be helpful to my fellow writers and readers within the Void.  #1 “Hurry!” the face on the screen was yelling. EDIT: “Hurry!” the voice yelled. “…yes yelling” can be easily shortened to “yelled,” making the sentence shorter. #2 Tendons in my shoulder tore. EDIT: Tendons tore in my shoulder. Having the verb “tore” at the end of the sentence sounded strange to me when reading aloud. And this revision allows my mind to process the sentence easier, given that I know what is happening to the tendons sooner.   #3 I could feel the needle inside my leg. EDIT: I felt the needle in my leg. Similar to Item #1, “could feel” can be shortened to “felt.”  #4 The spinning of the pod was slowing EDIT: The spinning of the pod slowed. Similar to Item’s #1 and #3, “was slowing” can be shortened to “slowed.”  #5 Thunder clapped from somewhere outside. EDIT: Thunder clapped outside. “From somewhere” isn’t essential in the sentence because by just saying “outside,” we know where the thunder is coming from.  #6 I’ll pass the event horizon in a few minutes. EDIT: I’ll cross the event horizon in a few minutes. In terms of black holes, it[…] [Keep Reading]

Interviews from the Void: Episode #2 – Avrin Kelly

Highlights The benefits to regularly writing short stories. Writing horror helps us understand fear, our strongest emotion as human beings. Various strategies for overcoming writers block. The possibilities are endless. Welcome to the second episode of Interviews from the Void, where I interview writers about their writing process, discussing the mechanics and physicality of the craft. I’m fascinated with writing as a physical effort and the perspectives of other writers on the process itself. In this episode, I’ve asked horror writer Avrin Kelly about her writing process and where she finds her inspiration. A. Macabe: Tell me more about your #52weeks52stories journey? What made you want to start? Is it helping you improve as a writer? Avrin Kelly: So far this year, I’ve written ten stories. #52weeks52stories is something I knew I wanted to take part in because short stories are life, for me at least. They’re like literary Robot Chicken, or teleporting somewhere new for a short time. The possibilities are endless. With every story I write, I feel like I get a little bit better at the craft. A. Macabe: When did you start writing? Avrin Kelly: I’m 30. I didn’t start writing in earnest until last year. I wrote my first short story in April of 2017. It was horrible (laughs). A. Macabe: Why was it horrible? Avrin Kelly: It was horrible because – at the time – I didn’t know the first thing about story structure and the ending was confusing. So, I decided to try again – now with[…] [Keep Reading]

10 Editing Examples – Entry #1

Editing is hard. As writers, we want every word we write to be perfectly used; etched in stone. Sometimes we must break the rock. Below are examples of my edits for my latest short story with brief explanations as to why I made the changes. I hope these examples will be helpful to my fellow writers and readers within the Void.  I must make one exception with the examples below: they apply to a short story, less than 2,500 words. If you’re working on a full-length novel, these examples won’t apply.   #1 They start to walk. EDIT: They started walking. Taking the advice of Chuck Wendig, I read this sentence out loud, and “They start to walk” sounds awful to me. Thus, to make not only a tense change but to improve the writing as well, it was changed to “They started walking.” #2 The world about my jolted. EDIT: The world about me jolted. Watch out for these. I find them all over my work during the editing process. I note this edit here because the original version “The world about my jolted” made it through three version of the story before it was caught. Even though my mind sees “my,” it still read “me.”  #3 I could now see he was a man. EDIT: I saw a man. Short stories require only the essential words. Nothing more. In the original version of this sentence, it contains a lot of extra wording which isn’t essential. The only thing I’m trying to[…] [Keep Reading]