2020 Writing Goals

I always commit to too many goals and projects. For example, in 2019, not only was I going to finish the next draft of my novel, but I would write a twenty-episode podcast, publish a collection of short stories, and publish my non-fiction blog project. None of those things happened. And I’m glad they didn’t. Instead, I spent my time developing other important and essential areas of my life. After much reflection on productivity and goal setting the last few years, I’m committing to a much simpler set of writing goals in 2020. I’m setting two goals: First, I will finish the fourth draft of my science fiction novel. Second, I intend to blog about the writing experience at least every two weeks. I hope readers of my short stories and my fellow writing friends will enjoy this journey with me.  Cheers, and good luck with your goals and projects in 2020. Let’s make it a great year. [Keep Reading]

Interviews from the Void: Episode #1 – S.P. Carter

Highlights Where do we find inspiration for our horror stories? It’s never too late to start writing. As writers, we need to know when to listen, but also when to trust ourselves. Everyone loves a good scare. Welcome to the first episode of Interviews from the Void, where I interview writers about their writing process, discussing the mechanics and physicality of the craft. I’m fascinated with writing as a physical effort and the perspectives of other writers on the process itself. In this first episode, I’ve asked horror writer S. P. Carter – whose debut horror novel, “Unraveling” is set to release later this year – about his writing process and where he finds his inspiration in the horror genre. A. Macabe: Tell us more about “Unraveling” S. P. Carter: When people commit mass shootings and other atrocities, they don’t snap; they spiral. “Unraveling” explores this transition in a man living an outwardly banal, middle-class family life who struggles against these demons. Hallucinations and paranoid delusions give you a front row seat into a mind fighting to hold itself together, and the destruction left in its wake. A. Macabe: Where did you get the idea for this story? S. P. Carter: As a survivor of childhood trauma, I’ve grappled with people’s motivations to harm each other, and often wondered if one day, a switch would flip in my head. By exploring what I would do in a fictional world, free of legal repercussion, I had an outlet. This led to[…] [Keep Reading]