Interviews from the Void: Episode #49 – B. K. Bass

Welcome to the forty-ninth episode of Interviews from the Void, where I interview writers about their writing process, discussing the mechanics and physicality of the craft. In this episode, I’m very excited to be chatting with BK Bass, my friend at Kyanite Publishing. I met Mr. Bass through Benjamin Hope, and they’ve published two of my short stories: THE SCHLIKT and HUMAN. Mr. Bass also shares more writing knowledge in an in-depth interview with our mutual creative friend and photographer, Andrew Hall. Arthur: Tell me about how you came into writing. Are there any experiences you have which inspire your stories? BK: I fell into it at a young age. In fifth grade I started reading Greek mythology, Edgar Allan Poe, Terry Brooks, Tolkien, and others. I fell in love with everything fantasy, mythological, and macabre. Soon, that branched out into science fiction. It wasn’t long before school writing assignments turned into a chance to explore my love of these stories from the other side of the pen, and before you know it, I was writing for fun. I kept practicing for about 25 years, and here I am today! Arthur: Tell me about Kyanite Publishing. I love working with you and your team. How did the idea for the company come about? What were the challenges? What has been the most positive part of the experience for you? BK: Thank you! My partner and I originally got together to do an indie book review site, and in the process[…] [Keep Reading]

The Purpose of Writing

Why do we write? It’s a question we often ask ourselves amidst the struggle of developing a story or writing a novel. Once our writing reaches a stagnation point – when the enjoyment of it becomes work – we stop. During that moment, I ask myself: Why am I writing this? It’s simple to think we will complete a writing project and no one will read it. It won’t have an effect on the world. It is also tempting to think this about anything in life. Why go through the effort? While working on a separate project for my professional career, I came across the following quote: “The English author and essayist Samuel Johnson said, ‘The only aim of writing is to enable the readers better to enjoy life or better to endure it.’ This happens, we think, because great authors lead readers to find or make meaning in their own lives.” I found this quote very powerful the moment I read it. The only aim of writing is to enable the readers better to enjoy life or better to endure it. To return to my original goals, and to further expand upon what I noted about writing in my interview with Andrew Hall, I hope that through my writing, I’m able to equip my readers with a sense of joy through the story; I intend to provide a sense of being which allows them to endure whatever moments they must. This is my purpose for writing. Source: Rosenbach, William[…] [Keep Reading]

“Creating Awesome” with Andrew Hall

I was recently interviewed by my fellow creative friend Andrew Hall – a photographer, entrepreneur and freelancer. His photography is incredible, with several different projects surrounding a potentially apocalyptic future. What’s intriguing about Andrew’s interview series, Creating Awesome, is the depth to which he is able to go with his interviewees. From business futurists to artists and writers, this interview series is a great resource for other creatives looking to connect. Some of my favorite quotes from the interviews: B. K. Bass: “One of my biggest motivations for writing is to leave something worthwhile behind after I’m gone. I want to contribute something to our society, and my writing is how I want to go about doing that.” Ron Gavalik: “A lot of writers don’t realize the power they hold.” Jack Uldrich: “The biggest change is that the rate of change is changing–it’s getting faster!” Wolfgang Muchow: “It’s all about story and character.” Robert Marzullo: “Produce something every day.” Cliff England: “I would rather do it myself and fail, then wait around for months or years for someone to give me permission or approval to do something.” Eric Ninaltowski: “If you’re young, don’t waste time. If you’re old, don’t waste time.” Ron Gavalik: “If you don’t know your truth, put down the pen and live a while. Figure out who you are and what makes you tick.” Liam Wong: “Make sure it will be fun and feasible – something that will keep me on track and that I will still be[…] [Keep Reading]

2020 Writing Goals

I always commit to too many goals and projects. For example, in 2019, not only was I going to finish the next draft of my novel, but I would write a twenty-episode podcast, publish a collection of short stories, and publish my non-fiction blog project. None of those things happened. And I’m glad they didn’t. Instead, I spent my time developing other important and essential areas of my life. After much reflection on productivity and goal setting the last few years, I’m committing to a much simpler set of writing goals in 2020. I’m setting two goals: First, I will finish the fourth draft of my science fiction novel. Second, I intend to blog about the writing experience at least every two weeks. I hope readers of my short stories and my fellow writing friends will enjoy this journey with me.  Cheers, and good luck with your goals and projects in 2020. Let’s make it a great year. [Keep Reading]

Interviews from the Void: Episode #4 – Tobias Klausmann

Highlights The use of names in our stories and their importance to the story’s world. Strategies for self-publishing. Why writing daily is important. Writing isn’t “I have an idea, now I’ll just write it down,” but “I have an idea, I’ll start writing and see where it takes me.” Welcome to the fourth episode of Interviews from the Void, where I interview writers about their writing process, discussing the mechanics and physicality of the craft. In this episode, I’ve asked science fiction writer Tobias Klausmann to tell us more about how he found his writing voice and his approach to writing character-driven science fiction. A. Macabe: You mention on your website you moved to Switzerland. What’s the history behind the move? Is English your first language? Do you think speaking multiple languages has helped your writing? Klausmann: I moved to Switzerland for work. Before June,  2010 I lived in northwestern Germany for twelve years, after moving there from the very southwest. Despite now living abroad, I am much closer to the town I grew up in. My mother tongue is German, but my father used to be an English teacher and in general – English-language media, especially music and books – were easily available to me as a kid and teenager. As for whether it helped with writing, it has definitely influenced how I think about language. Sometimes you know the perfect idiom or turn of phrase in one language, but come up empty in another. For me, that usually[…] [Keep Reading]

Interviews from the Void: Episode #1 – S.P. Carter

Highlights Where do we find inspiration for our horror stories? It’s never too late to start writing. As writers, we need to know when to listen, but also when to trust ourselves. Everyone loves a good scare. Welcome to the first episode of Interviews from the Void, where I interview writers about their writing process, discussing the mechanics and physicality of the craft. I’m fascinated with writing as a physical effort and the perspectives of other writers on the process itself. In this first episode, I’ve asked horror writer S. P. Carter – whose debut horror novel, “Unraveling” is set to release later this year – about his writing process and where he finds his inspiration in the horror genre. A. Macabe: Tell us more about “Unraveling” S. P. Carter: When people commit mass shootings and other atrocities, they don’t snap; they spiral. “Unraveling” explores this transition in a man living an outwardly banal, middle-class family life who struggles against these demons. Hallucinations and paranoid delusions give you a front row seat into a mind fighting to hold itself together, and the destruction left in its wake. A. Macabe: Where did you get the idea for this story? S. P. Carter: As a survivor of childhood trauma, I’ve grappled with people’s motivations to harm each other, and often wondered if one day, a switch would flip in my head. By exploring what I would do in a fictional world, free of legal repercussion, I had an outlet. This led to[…] [Keep Reading]